Riders United For A Sovereign America

Prefer Lower Numbers

Sixty-three percent of likely American voters believe illegal immigration is a major problem. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

Seventy-four percent of
likely American voters agree with the following statement: “We have to stop the flow of illegals before we address what to do about those who already are here.” McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

Fifty-nine percent of
Americans polled believe the more effective way to deal with the potential treat to national security posed by millions of illegal immigrants living within the United States is to crack down on illegal immigration by toughening the enforcement of existing laws, deporting illegal immigrants and prosecuting the employers who illegally employ workers.
UPI/Zogby Poll
; April 13-16, 2007

Fifty-three percent of
California voters favor a policy of rounding-up and deporting illegal aliens.
Field Poll PDF; March 20-31, 2007

Most
California voters continue to consider illegal immigration a serious problem, with forty-nine percent rating it very serious and twenty-eight percent somewhat serious.
Field Poll PDF; March 20-31, 2007

Fifty-four percent of
Americans polled believe illegal aliens harm the nation's economy.
Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg Poll; April 5-9, 2007

Fifty-five percent of
all adults think it is extremely or very likely that a large number of illegal immigrants coming into this country would be a threat in the next five years.
Harris Poll, January 5-12, 2007


Sixty-four percent of voters believe America needs to reduce the numbe of immigrants if immigration continues at its current level for the next 50 years, experts estimate that it will add approximately 100 million people to the United States population, which currently is 300 million.
The Polling Company Inc./Woman Trend, October 2, 2006

Sixty-six percent of
voters agree with the statement, "The population increase caused by the present level of immigration will negatively impact the quality of life in America, such as causing more congestion, overcrowding and pollution."
The Polling Company Inc./Woman Trend, October 2, 2006

Without a change in immigration policy, the nation's population will grow by more than a third in the next 50 years. If the population where you live were to increase by this amount, sixty-five percent of
voters say it would make the quality of life worse.
The Polling Company Inc./Woman Trend, October 2, 2006

Seventy-one percent of
Americans polled believe illegal immigration poses a threat to the United States.
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 11-18, 2006

Compared to other problems facing the country, thirty-two percent on
Americans polled believe illegal immigration is "one of the most important" problems facing the country while fifty-five percent said it is an "important" problem.
Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg Poll, June 24-27, 2006

Sixty-seven percent of
Americans approve of the U.S. government deporting illegal immigrants to the country they came from.
Opinion Research Corporation/Lou Dobbs poll, June 8-11, 2006

Sixty-seven percent of
Americans would you like to see the number of illegal immigrants currently in this country decreased.
Opinion Research Corporation/Lou Dobbs poll, June 8-11, 2006

Fifty-seven percent of
registered voters believe the illegal immigration situation in the United States is "very serious" and twenty-nine percent believe it is "somewhat serious."
FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll, May 16-18, 2006

Fifty-five percent of
registered voters "favor" trying to send as many illegal immigrants back to their home countries as possible.
FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll, May 16-18, 2006

Seventy-seven percent of
Americans think the United States is not doing enough to keep illegal immigrants from coming into this country.
ABC News/Washington Post Poll, May 11-15, 2006

Fifty-seven percent of
Americans think the May 1, 2006 illegal alien solidarity protests did more to hurt their cause than help.
NBC News/Wall Street Journal Poll, April 21-24, 2006


On immigration generally,
Americans want less, not more, immigration. Only twenty-six percent said immigrants were assimilating fine and that immigration should continue at current levels, compared to sixty-seven percent who said immigration should be reduced so we can assimilate those already here.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

While the Senate is considering various bills that would increase legal immigration from 1 million to 2 million a year, two percent of Americans believe current immigration is too low. This was true for virtually every grouping in the survey by ethnicity, income, age, religion, region, party, or ideology thought immigration was too low.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

When given three choices (House approach, Senate approach, or mass deportation), the public tends to reject both the Senate plan and a policy of mass deportations in favor of the House bill; twenty-eight percent want the Senate plan, twelve percent want mass deportations; while fifty-six percent want the House approach. But when given a choice between just the House and Senate approaches, without the choice of mass deportations, the public prefers the House approach sixty-four percent version to thirty percent.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

Informed that U.S. population is projected to grow to 420 million by 2050, fifty-seven percent of respondents believed that the present U.S. population of 300 million or less would be best for the country in the long run.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Six of ten
Americans, according to the poll, favor annual immigration (now one million yearly) of less than 600,000 a year. Forty-five percent of respondents favored annual immigration of less than 300,000. Overall, seventy-two percent of respondents favor an annual immigration level that is less than the current one million.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Fifty-six percent of
Americans agree that a practical way to reduce to near zero the number of resident illegal aliens is legislation making penalties for illegal presence so severe that illegal immigrants would leave voluntarily rather than run the risk of being caught and penalized.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Two
Americans in three (sixty-eight percent) agree that the United States should set a goal of completely halting new illegal immigration.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Over half of
Americans (fifty-five percent) support the goal of reducing the population of 10 to 12 million illegal immigrants now residing in the United States "to near zero."
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006


One hundred percent of Americans
believe it is important that the government take steps this year to control U.S. borders to halt the flow of illegal aliens.
The Gallup Poll, April 7-9, 2006

Eighty-one percent of
Americans believe that illegal immigration to the United States is "out of control."
The Gallup Poll, April 7-9, 2006

Almost all
Americans (eighty-seven percent) say they are concerned illegals will overburden government services, including 61 percent that are "very" concerned and another 26 percent that are "somewhat" concerned.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

Almost all
Americans (ninety percent) say illegal immigration is a "very" serious (sixty percent) or "somewhat" serious (thirty percent) problem for the country today — essentially unchanged from a year ago this time.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

The majority of
Republicans (sixty-five percent) and Democrats (fifty-eight percent) say illegal immigration is a "very" serious problem.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

Sixty-one percent said they are less likely to be sympathetic to illegal aliens as a result of the protests.
Zogby Poll, March 31-April 3, 2006


Eighty-two percent say that the United States is not doing enough to keep illegals from entering this country.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, March 29-30, 2006

Sixty-one percent say they are "very concerned" that illegal aliens
cost taxpayers too much money to provide them with services.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, March 29-30, 2006

Sixty-two percent of
Americans polled said they want their own congressional representative to support more restrictive policies governing immigration.
Zogby Poll, released March 19, 2006 / conducted February 3-7, 2006

Fifty-seven percent of
American voters polled say illegal immigration into the U.S. is a "very serious problem."
Quinnipiac University National Poll
, February 21-28, 2006

Eighty-three percent of
American immigrant voters, or the children or grandchildren of immigrants, say illegal immigration is a serious problem.
Quinnipiac University National Poll, February 21-28, 2006

Sixty-two percent of American voters are opposed to making it easier for illegal immigrants to become citizens, with immigrant families opposed fifty-six percent.
Quinnipiac University National Poll, February 21-28, 2006


Seventy-three percent of Californians say they are concerned to some degree about illegal immigration, with forty-three percent being "extremely concerned."
Field Poll, February 12-26 2006


Fifty-seven percent of
California voters say illegal immigration is having a negative effect on the state.
Field Poll, February 12-26 2006

Sixty percent of
Americans polled say there are already too many people in the U.S. without adding illegal aliens.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006

Eighty-nine percent of
Americans polled say illegal immigration into the U.S. is a problem.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006

Oppose Amnesty

Fifty-nine percent of Americans polled believe the more effective way to deal with the potential treat to national security posed by millions of illegal immigrants living within the United States is to crack down on illegal immigration by toughening the enforcement of existing laws, deporting illegal immigrants and prosecuting the employers who illegally employ workers.
UPI/Zogby Poll; April 13-16, 2007


Sixty-one percent of likely American voters say there ar no blanket conditions under which they would support giving legal, green-card status to millions of illegal immigrants. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

Sixty-one percent of
likely American voters oppose providing a path to US citizenship for those illegal immigrants who entered the United States illegally, and who fraudulently obtained green cards and Social Security  numbers, when millions are playing by the rules and waiting in their countries to enter the United States legally. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

Fifty-four percent of
Americans polled believe illegal aliens harm the nation's economy.
Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg Poll; April 5-9, 2007

One reason the public does not like
Senate proposals to legalize illegals and double legal immigration is that seventy-three percent said they had little or no confidence in the ability of the government to screen these additional applicants to weed out terrorists and criminals.
Zogby/CIS poll
, April 17-24, 2006

By eight-to-one,
Americans think it is unfair to grant rights to illegal immigrants while thousands of people wait each year to come to the United States legally. Fully eighty-six percent of Republicans think it is unfair, as do seventy-seven percent of Democrats.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

Sixty-five percent of those surveyed said they would be willing to pay significantly higher prices for some goods and services should that be the result of tighter control of the southern U.S. border and a resulting lower number of undocumented workers.
Zogby Poll, March 31-April 3, 2006


Fifty-six percent of
Americans polled say the U.S. should NOT grant temporary-worker status to foreigners who are here illegally, as this would make them and their families eligible for government services while they are here. We should not reward people who have broken the law, and this will encourage even more people to enter the United States illegally.
NBC News/Wall Street Journal Poll, March 10-13, 2006

Protect Jobs and Wages

Fifty-seven percent of adults polled favor an immigration bill that incorporates imposing new fines on businesses that hire illegal aliens.
NBC News/Wall Street Journal Poll; June 8-11, 2007


Fifty-nine percent of Americans polled believe the more effective way to deal with the potential treat to national security posed by millions of illegal immigrants living within the United States is to crack down on illegal immigration by toughening the enforcement of existing laws, deporting illegal immigrants and prosecuting the employers who illegally employ workers.
UPI/Zogby Poll; April 13-16, 2007

Seventy-seven percent of Americans polled believe employers should be punished for hiring illegal aliens.
Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg Poll; April 5-9, 2007

Sixty-three percent of California voters favor stiffening penalties on businesses that hire illegal aliens.
Field Poll PDF; March 20-31, 2007

Seventy-nine percent of likely American voters disagree that public officials should use taxpayer funds to operate day laborer sites that help illegal aliens.
Judicial Watch-Zogby International Poll of Likely Voters PDF; March 22-26, 2007


Eighty-six percent of
Americans favor the government issuing new tamper-proof Social Security cards as a way for people to prove they are eligible to work in the United States and believe such cards should be shown by potential new hires in order to get a job in the U.S.
USA Today/Gallup Poll; March 2-4, 2007

Fifty-five percent of
Arizona voters would support a proposal that would make it a felony for businesses in Arizona to hire illegal immigrants. KAET-TV and Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication poll; February 22-25, 2007

Eighty-three percent of
Iowa's adults place more of the blame on companies that hired the undocumented immigrants, while nine percent pin more of the blame on the workers. The other eight percent are undecided.
The Iowa Poll, January 21-24, 2007

Sixty-three percent of
American voters support or oppose fining businesses that employ illegal immigrants.
Quinnipiac University Poll; November 13-19, 2006

Fifty-six percent of
Colorado residents polled, including fifty-nine percent of Hispanics, believe employers should be "severely penalized" for hiring illegal aliens.

The Denver Post/Mason-Dixon Polling and Research
, July 12-13, 2006

Eighty-three percent of
Oklahomans favor increasing penalties for employers that hire illegal aliens.
Tulsa World and KOTV poll, July 8-11, 2006

Sixty p
ercent of
Americans favor imposing fines of tens of thousands of dollars on employers who hire illegal immigrants.
Opinion Research Corporation/Lou Dobbs poll, June 8-11, 2006

One reason the public does not like legalizations is that they are skeptical of need for illegal-immigrant labor. An overwhelming majority of seventy-seven percent said there are plenty of Americans to fill low-wage jobs if employers pay more and treat workers better; just fifteen percent said there are not enough Americans for such jobs.

Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

Eighty-one percent of Americans polled support strict criminal penalties on employers who, after repeatedly being cited, persist in knowingly hiring illegal aliens.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006


Eighty-four percent of
Americans believe the most effective way to reduce illegal immigration is to cut off the employment incentive for coming here by instituting tough penalties for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. More than half think this would be "very effective," and another 32% say it would be "somewhat effective."
The Gallup Poll, April 7-9, 2006

Fifty-nine percent of
black California voters favor imposing stiff penalties on employers and individuals who hire illegal aliens.
The Field Poll, April 3-10, 2006


Sixty percent of
California voters favor imposing stiff penalties on employers and individuals who hire illegal aliens.
The Field Poll, April 3-10, 2006


Seventy-three percent of
Americans favor imposing fines and criminal charges against employers who hire illegals.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

More than ninety percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed believe illegal immigration is a problem.  Seventy percent rank it as a "very serious" or "serious" problem.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration
, April 4, 2006

Eighty-six percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed say illegal immigration should have a "very high" or "high" priority for Congress and the Bush administration.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration
, April 4, 2006

Sixty-three percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed oppose amnesty for illegal immigrants if they only need to prove that they have been living in the U.S. for at least three years.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration, April 4, 2006

Increasing penalties for employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens was supported by seventy-eight percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration, April 4, 2006

Seventy-one percent support major penalties for employers who hire illegals.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, March 29-30, 2006

Seventy-six percent of Americans polled are concerned that American workers can't afford to work for the same low wages as illegal aliens.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006


Sixty-three percent of Americans polled are concerned about illegal aliens taking away jobs from American workers.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006


Seventy-four percent of Americans polled favor providing major penalties for employers convicted of hiring illegal aliens and strongly enforcing it.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006


Eighty percent on
Arizona voters favor penalizing businesses that hire illegal aliens.
KAET-TV and Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication poll, January 19-22, 2006

Support Tougher Enforcement

NewFifty-eight percent of Americans favor cutting off federal funds to sanctuary cities. Rasmussen Reports; August 18, 2007

NewFifty-six percent of Americans want the federal government to continue building a fence along the Mexican border. Rasmussen Reports; August 18, 2007

The government has staged a number of raids on businesses that employ large numbers of illegal immigrants where undocumented workers are immediately sent to detention centers. Fifty-five percent of American voters say their generally support these raids.
Opinion Dynamics / Fox News poll; June 5-6, 2007

Eighty-two percent of likely American voters favor requiring voters to show valid photo identification when they vote on Election Day in order to stop voter fraud and illegal immigrants from voting. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

More highlights from this poll:

  • Seventy-eight percent of likely American voters support the creation of a tamper-proof identification card system to determine instantly whether a job applicant is legally entitled to work inside the United States, and to hold those employers who hire illegal workers accountable.

  • Seventy-five percent of likely American voters favor prohibiting states from issuing drivers’ licenses to illegal immigrants.

  • Seventy-seven percent of likely American voters favor repealing local sanctuary laws that protect illegal immigrants by requiring local and state police to detain illegal immigrants when they are arrested or stopped for other crimes, whether these crimes are felonies or misdemeanors, and to hold them for deportation.

  • Sixty-eight percent of likely American voters support enacting a new immigration policy of “zero tolerance” towards illegal immigrants, where any illegal immigrant in the United States would be deported to their country of citizenship.
  • Seventy percent of likely American voters favor hiring 6,000 new border patrol agents to bring the total force to 18,000 agents. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007


Fifty-nine percent of
Americans polled believe the more effective way to deal with the potential treat to national security posed by millions of illegal immigrants living within the United States is to crack down on illegal immigration by toughening the enforcement of existing laws, deporting illegal immigrants and prosecuting the employers who illegally employ workers.
UPI/Zogby Poll; April 13-16, 2007

Seventy percent of Americans polled said they support the REAL ID program, which requires each state to change its drivers license systems to meet national standards and ensure that their databases are compatible with other states.
UPI/Zogby Poll; April 13-16, 2007

Seventy-one percent of California voters favor increasing the number of federal agents patrolling the border.
Field Poll PDF; March 20-31, 2007

Seventy-two percent of likely American voters believe local law enforcement officials should help enforce federal immigration laws.
Judicial Watch-Zogby International Poll of Likely Voters PDF; March 22-26, 2007

When addressing the issue of illegal immigration, sixty-six percent of likely American voters believe there should there be more emphasis placed on law enforcement.
Judicial Watch-Zogby International Poll of Likely Voters PDF; March 22-26, 2007

Seventy-seven percent of Americans polled believe employers should be punished for hiring illegal aliens.
Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg Poll; April 5-9, 2007

Fifty-one percent of
Arizona voters polled would like to designate illegal immigrants as "domestic terrorists" if they commit serious crimes while in the U.S.
Cronkite/Eight poll; February 22-25, 2007

Sixty-five percent of
registered voters support changing Arizona law so illegal immigrants could be charged with criminal trespass.
Cronkite/Eight poll; February 22-25, 2007

By a sixty-eight to twenty-five margin,
Americans support the ordinances proposed by Hazleton, PA Mayor Louis Barletta and adopted by City Council to suspend the business licenses of employers who hire illegal aliens, penalize landlords who rent to illegal aliens with fines and make English the official language.
Susquehanna Polling and Research ; February 22-26, 2007

By a sixty-seven to twenty-six margin,
Americans say they would support an ordinance similar to Hazleton, PA's in their own communities.
Susquehanna Polling and Research ; February 22-26, 2007

Sixty-five percent of
Arizona voters surveyed said they would support letting police officers charge illegal immigrants with criminal trespassing.
KAET-TV and Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication poll; February 22-25, 2007

Sixty-eight percent of Americans say gaining control of the border is more important than legalizing undocumented workers.
Rasmussen Reports; November 28-29, 2006

Seventy-one percent of American voters think measures in addition to a 700-mile border fence are needed from Congress to deal with illegal immigrants entering the country.
Quinnipiac University Poll; November 13-19, 2006

Seventy-six percent of
Arizona voters polled support for measures to deny bail to illegal immigrants charged with a serious felony.
Arizona State University, August 24-29, 2006

Seventy-six percent of Oklahomans favor sending National Guard troops to the border to prevent illegal aliens from entering the U.S.
Tulsa World and KOTV poll, July 8-11, 2006

Seventy-two percent of all
New York State residents say that entering the United States without valid immigration documents should be made a criminal offense.
2006 Empire State Poll; July 2006

Seventy-eight percent of Americans favor putting more Border Patrol and federal law enforcement agents on the U.S. border with Mexico.
Opinion Research Corporation/Lou Dobbs poll, June 8-11, 2006

Fifty-six percent of Americans favor sending National Guard troops to the U.S. border with Mexico.
Opinion Research Corporation/Lou Dobbs poll, June 8-11, 2006

Seventy-nine percent of
registered voters "favor" increasing the number of federal agents patrolling the border to stop illegal immigration.
FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll, May 16-18, 2006

Sixty-three percent of
registered voters "favor" using thousands of National Guard troops temporarily to help border patrol agents along the Mexican border to stop illegal immigration.
FOX News/Opinion Dynamics Poll, May 16-18, 2006

Sixty-two percent of Americans say they would favor stationing 6,000 National Guard troops in a support capacity at the U.S.-Mexico border to try to stop illegal immigration.
CBS News Poll, May 16-17, 2006

Sixty-eight percent of Americans think stationing National Guard troops at the U.S.-Mexico border would be effective in reducing the number of illegal immigrants to the U.S.
CBS News Poll, May 16-17, 2006

Seventy-four percent of
Americans support using National Guard troops to patrol the U.S. border with Mexico.
ABC News/Washington Post Poll, May 12-14, 2006

When offered by itself, there is strong support for the
House bill: sixty-nine percent said it was a good or very good idea when told it tries to make illegals go home by fortifying the border, forcing employer verification, and encouraging greater cooperation with local law enforcement while not increasing legal immigration; twenty-seven percent said it was a bad or very bad idea. Support for the House approach was widespread, with eighty-one percent of Republicans, seventy-two percent of independents, fifty-seven percent of Democrats, and fifty-three percent of Hispanics saying it was good or very good idea.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

When offered by itself, there is also some support for the
Senate approach, thought not as much as for the House bill: forty-two percent said the Senate approach was a good or very good idea when told it would allow illegal immigrants to apply for legal status provided they met certain criteria, and it would significantly increase legal immigration and increase enforcement of immigration laws; fifty percent said it was a bad or very bad idea.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

Public also does not buy the argument we have tried and failed to enforce the law: seventy-one percent felt that past enforcement efforts have been "grossly inadequate," while only nineteen percent felt we had made a "real effort" to enforce our laws.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

Seventy-four percent of Americans support using National Guard troops to patrol the U.S.-Mexico border.

Washington Post-ABC News poll, April 14-16, 2006

Of those Americans polled who favored the goal of halting new illegal immigration, 64 percent support tough penalties against violators such as fines and mandatory prison terms, followed by deportation.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Of those Americans polled who favored reducing to near zero the number of resident illegal aliens, 72 percent of that group also support tough penalties against violators such as fines and mandatory prison terms, followed by deportation.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Sixty-one percent of
Americans support making illegal immigration a crime, and fifty-two percent support making it a crime to knowingly assist an illegal alien.
The Gallup Poll, April 7-9, 2006

Sixty percent of
Americans believe not allowing illegal aliens to use American schools and hospitals would be effective at reducing illegal immigration: thirty percent call this very effective and 30 percent say it is somewhat effective.
The Gallup Poll, April 7-9, 2006

The vast majority of
Americans also see value in beefing up the number of border control officers: thirty-seven percent call this very effective and forty-four percent say it is somewhat effective.
The Gallup Poll, April 7-9, 2006

Sixty-six percent of
black California voters favor building a wall along major sections of the border between the U.S. and Mexico to stop illegal aliens from entering the U.S.
The Field Poll
, April 3-10, 2006

Sixty-four percent of
California voters oppose allowing illegal aliens to obtain a driver's license in California.
The Field Poll, April 3-10, 2006

Fifty-seven percent of
Americans polled favor deporting as many illegals as possible.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

Fifty-five percent of
Americans polled favor using the U.S. military to stop entry at the borders.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006


Eighty percent of
Americans polled favor increasing the number of border patrol agents.
Opinion Dynamics Poll for FOX News, April 4-5, 2006

Americans would limit illegals' access to government services, such as driver’s licenses (sixty-nine percent not allow), health care/food stamps (seventy-five percent not allow), and attending public schools (fifty-one percent not allow).
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, March 29-30, 2006

Sixty-two percent favor taking whatever steps are necessary at the borders, including the use of the military, to cut the flow of illegals into this country.

Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, March 29-30, 2006

Fifty-six percent favor building a security fence along the U.S.-Mexican border.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, March 29-30, 2006

Seventy-one percent of
Americans polled say they are more likely to vote for a Congressional Candidate who favors tighter controls on illegal immigration.
NBC News/Wall Street Journal Poll
, March 10-13, 2006
Seventy-one percent of
Americans polled say they are concerned that illegal aliens increase the amount of crime.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006

Seventy percent of
Americans polled are concerned that illegal aliens increase the likelihood of terrorism in the United States.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006

Seventy-four percent of
Americans polled say the U.S. isn't doing enough along its borders to keep illegal aliens from crossing into this country.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006

Oppose Rewards for
Illegal Migration

Fifty-nine percent of Americans polled believe the more effective way to deal with the potential treat to national security posed by millions of illegal immigrants living within the United States is to crack down on illegal immigration by toughening the enforcement of existing laws, deporting illegal immigrants and prosecuting the employers who illegally employ workers.
UPI/Zogby Poll; April 13-16, 2007

Seventy-one percent of likely American voters would support a law to STOP the use of taxpayer funds to provide Medicaid, welfare, and other government services for illegal immigrants. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

Seventy-seven percent of likely American voters oppose giving Social Security benefits and credit to illegal immigrants. McLaughlin & Associates poll; April 12-15, 2007

Seventy-three
percent of Americans
believe illegal aliens should be barred from Medicaid benefits.
Zogby Poll; February 9-12, 2007


Sixty percent of all
Californians are opposed to health care for illegal aliens.
Survey and Policy Research Institute At San Jose State; January 11, 2006

Sixty-one percent of
Arizona voters polled would bar illegal immigrants from receiving punitive damages in civil lawsuits.
Arizona State University, August 24-29, 2006

Sixty-eight percent of Colorado residents polled, including fifty-six percent of Hispanics, believe illegal aliens are costing Colorado a lot of tax money.
The Denver Post/Mason-Dixon Polling and Research, July 12-13, 2006

Sixty-six percent of Americans polled believe illegal aliens cost the taxpayers too much by using government services like public education and medical services.
Gallup Poll, June 8-25, 2006

Fifty-three percent of
Americans polled support legislation to deny automatic U.S. citizenship to children born here to parents who are illegal aliens.
Roper ASW Poll conducted for Negative Population Growth (NPG), April 14-16, 2006

Sixty-two percent of
California voters oppose driver's licenses for illegal aliens.
Field Poll, February 12-26 2006

Seventy-two percent of
American voters are opposed to allowing illegal immigrants to get drivers' licenses, with immigrant voter families opposed sixty-six percent.
Quinnipiac University National Poll
, February 21-28, 2006

Eighty-four percent of
American voters are in favor of requiring proof of legal residency in order to obtain government benefits, with immigrant voter families in support eighty percent.
Quinnipiac University National Poll
, February 21-28, 2006

Eighty-three percent of
Americans polled are concerned that it costs taxpayers too much money to provide illegal aliens with services such as health care and education.
Time Magazine/SRBI Survey, January 24-26, 2006

Hispanics on Immigration

McLaughlin & Associates conducted a national survey of 1,000 likely general election voters between April 12th and 15th, 2007.  A subsequent oversample of 202 Latino voters was conducted to bring the national sample of Latinos to 300 respondents.  The Latino oversample interviewing was conducted by bi-lingual interviewers to allow for Spanish-speaking Latino voters.  The oversample was then weighted into the overall results in order to ensure a sample representative of national voters.

Click here to view the McLaughlin & Associates poll


Eighty-two percent of Latinos polled support requiring voters to show valid photo identification when they vote on Election Day in order to stop voter fraud and illegal immigrants from voting.

Seventy-three percent of Latinos favor creating a tamper-proof identification card system to determine instantly whether a job applicant is legally entitled to work inside the United States, and to hold those employers who hire illegal workers accountable.

Fifty-nine percent of Latinos support prohibiting states from issuing drivers’ licenses to illegal immigrants.


Sixty-seven percent of Latinos favor the illegal immigration proposal in Congress to create a tamper-proof worker’s card and national database for immigrants who are in the United States legally. In order to hire a worker, employers would have to be presented with the tamper-proof worker’s card to check the national database and make sure the worker is here legally. If the worker is not in the database, then the worker is here illegally and the employer must report it to the authorities.

Sixty-seven percent of Latinos support repealing local sanctuary laws that protect illegal immigrants by requiring local and state police to detain illegal immigrants when they are arrested or stopped for other crimes, whether these crimes are felonies or misdemeanors, and to hold them for deportation.

Fifty-six percent of Latinos favor enacting a new immigration policy of “zero tolerance” towards illegal immigrants, where any illegal immigrant in the United States would be deported to their country of citizenship.

Fifty-seven percent of Latinos would support measure to STOP the use of taxpayer funds to provide Medicaid, welfare, and other government services for illegal immigrants. 

Seventy-two percent of Latinos oppose giving Social Security benefits and credit to illegal immigrants.

Fifty-three percent of Latinos would support changing U.S. citizenship law regarding birthright citizenship so that, like most other countries, if a child is born in the United States, one of the child’s parents must already be a U.S. citizen in order for the child to be a U.S. citizen.

Fifty-four percent of Latinos oppose providing a path to US citizenship for those illegal immigrants who entered the United States illegally, and who fraudulently obtained green cards and Social Security  numbers, when millions are playing by the rules and waiting in their countries to enter the United States legally. 

Fifty-six percent of Latinos favor hiring 6,000 new border patrol agents to bring the total force to 18,000 agents.

 
Fifty-four percent of
California's Latino voters favor increasing the number of federal agents patrolling the border.
Field Poll
PDF; March 20-31, 2007


Fifty-six percent of
Colorado residents polled, including fifty-nine percent of Hispanics, believe employers should be "severely penalized" for hiring illegal aliens.

The Denver Post/Mason-Dixon Polling and Research
, July 12-13, 2006

Sixty-eight percent of Colorado residents polled, including fifty-six percent of Hispanics, believe illegal aliens are costing Colorado a lot of tax money.
The Denver Post/Mason-Dixon Polling and Research, July 12-13, 2006


There were few groups in which a majority supported the Senate plan, even when presented by itself, exceptions included Hispanics sixty-two percent of whom said it was a good or very good idea and the most liberal voters (progressives) fifty-four percent of whom approved of it.
Zogby/CIS poll, April 17-24, 2006

Forty-six percent of Mexicans (approximately 46 million people) would immigrate to the United States and more than twenty percent of them would enter illegally if given the chance. Specifically:

  • Sixty-five percent of U.S.-born Latinos say Immigrants strengthen the U.S.
  • Twenty-eight percent of U.S.-born Latinos say immigrants are a burden on the U.S.
  • Eighty-nine percent of foreign-born Latinos say immigrants strengthen the U.S.
  • Five percent of foreign-born Latinos say immigrants are a burden on the U.S.
  • Eighty percent of all Latinos say immigrants strengthen the U.S.
  • Fourteen percent of all Latinos say Immigrants are a burden on the U.S.
  • Sixty percent of U.S.-born Latinos approve restricting driver's licenses to U.S. citizens or legal immigrants.
  • Twenty-nine percent of foreign-born Latinos approve restricting driver's licenses to U.S. citizens or legal immigrants.
  • Forty-five percent of Latinos residing in Mexico say they would move to the U.S. increase their family income by 7 times minimum wage.
  • Forty-five percent of Latinos residing in Mexico say they would move to the U.S. increase their family income by 3-7 times minimum wage.
  • Forty-seven percent of Latinos residing in Mexico say they would move to the U.S. increase their family income by 0-3 times minimum wage.
    Pew Hispanic Center poll , August 2005
Black Americans on Immigration

NewResults from the George Mason University Survey of Virginia Residents released on June 8, 2007:

  • Sixty-eight percent of black Virginians oppose the creation of government-sponsored hiring centers for day laborers, which may include illegal aliens.
  • Almost eighty-one percent of black Virginians favor requiring local police to check the immigration status of people they encounter during routine activities, such as traffic violations.
  • Almost fifty-percent of black Virginians approve of groups of people known as Minutemen who look for illegal aliens along the Mexican border and in communities in order to report them to authorities.
  • Sixty-six percent of black Virginians agree that illegal immigration takes jobs away from American workers.
  • Seventy percenty of black Virginians agree that illegal alien workers in the labor market tend to lower the wages and salaries of American workers.
  • Sixty percent of black Virginians agree that illegal immigration hurts American customs and way of life.
  • Almost seventy-three percent of black Virginians agree that illegal immigration increases the dangers of terrorism. George Mason University Survey of Virginia Residents; June 8, 2007

Sixty-six percent of black California voters favor building a wall along major sections of the border between the U.S. and Mexico to stop illegal aliens from entering the U.S.
The Field Poll, April 3-10, 2006


Fifty-nine percent of
black California voters favor imposing stiff penalties on employers and individuals who hire illegal aliens.
The Field Poll, April 3-10, 2006

Union Members on Immigration

Former Calif. Governor Gray Davis' granting of drivers licenses to illegal aliens was cited as a key reason why 31 percent of Democrats in unions were likely to vote to recall him.
Los Angeles Times Poll, September 2003

Business Owners on Immigration

Seventy-six percent of micro-business owners believe illegal immigration is a serious issue facing the nation.
National Association for the Self-Employed member survey, June 2006

Micro-business owners indicated the following reasons why they believe illegal immigration is a problem for our nation:
  • Thirteen percent - National Security and Terrorism
  • Thirty-two percent - Cost of illegal immigration on taxpayers
  • Twenty-three percent - Burden to our public services (health care, schools, etc.)
  • Thirteen percent - Loss of jobs and/or low wages of Americans due to low cost, illegal labor
  • One percent - Increased crime
  • Ten percent - Against the law to be in our country undocumented
  • Seven percent - Other
    National Association for the Self-Employed member survey, June 2006

Micro-business owners said they favor the following proposals relating to immigration which have been suggested by Congress and the Administration:

  • Fifty-eight percent - Construct a wall at our borders to stop illegal crossings.
  • Eighty-eight percent - Construct a wall at our borders to stop illegal crossings.
  • Seventy-two percent - Utilize National Guard troops at the Mexican border to help border patrol stop those trying to cross the border illegally.
  • Eighty-four percent - Impose tougher penalties on companies that hire illegal immigrants.
  • Sixty-two percent - Do not allow illegal immigrants at all in our country. If immigrants enter illegally, detain them and return them to their country of origin.
    National Association for the Self-Employed member survey, June 2006
Eighty-two percent of micro-business owners oppose offering amnesty to all illegal immigrants currently in our country.
National Association for the Self-Employed member survey, June 2006

More than ninety percent of
NFIB small-business owners
surveyed believe illegal immigration is a problem.  Seventy percent rank it as a "very serious" or "serious" problem.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration
, April 4, 2006

Eighty-six percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed say illegal immigration should have a "very high" or "high" priority for Congress and the Bush administration.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration
, April 4, 2006

Sixty-three percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed oppose amnesty for illegal immigrants if they only need to prove that they have been living in the U.S. for at least three years.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration, April 4, 2006

Increasing penalties for employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens was supported by seventy-eight percent of
NFIB small-business owners surveyed.
National Federation of Independent Business Research Foundation Member Survey on Immigration, April 4, 2006

Moderates and Independents on Immigration

President Bush's job approval rating has dropped by 10 percentile from 60 to 50 percent. His approval rating matches the lowest of his entire presidency, and his disapproval rating is now at the highest ever at 45 percent. One of the three main reasons for the decline in the President's popularity is his wildly unpopular amnesty/guest worker proposal. Most of the President's huge decline in popularity has been among Independents.
CBS New Poll, January 2004

Women on Immigration

Over half (fifty-six percent) of women think legal immigration should be reduced. Only 10 percent of women think legal immigration should be increased.
CBS News/New York Times poll, September and December 2001

A majority of women (eighty-four percent) think the United States has made it too easy for people from other countries to enter the United States.
CBS News/New York Times poll, September and December 2001

Opinion Elites vs. Public

Fifty-four percent of those polled disapprove of President Bush's handling of immigration issues -- his lowest rating on any issue other than the budget deficit.
CNN/Gallup/USA Today poll, January 2005

 
 


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